Access Control

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Access control is continually evolving and smart card technology keeps up with changes in compliance, functionality and security. Featuring 13.56 MHz read/write contactless smart card technology, smart card systems provide versatile interoperability and supports multiple applications.

Smart card readers and credentials — printable PVC cards, clamshell cards, key fobs and tokens — make access control more powerful, more versatile, and most important of all, offers enhanced security through encryption and mutual authentication.

Many organizations utilize 13.56 MHz smart card technology — iCLASS Seos®, iCLASS SE, standard iCLASS®, MIFARE®, MIFARE DESFire® and more — for employee photo ID badges to track and authorize access to restricted areas, but smart cards are used in various controlled access and other security, identification, admission, and toll applications.

IdentiSys has unparalleled experience with smart card access and security. Whether you need to control access to a single door or a complex multi-site facility, IdentiSys provides complete end-to-end solutions and service.

Many offices, schools, retail stores, hospitals and organizations have ID cards that integrate some form of access control to help monitor cardholder activity and restrict access to certain, sensitive areas of the facilities. A policy covering access control cards should address the following:

FUNCTION OF THE CARD

It may seem basic, but it’s important to explain the basic functions of an access control card in an ID card program. In this section, explain what the card does, and how to use the card and readers.

AREAS WHERE CARDS MAY BE USED

Elaborate on where access control-enabled ID cards are to be used, and when and why. For example, college student ID cards may be used as access control cards to enter the library after normal hours of operation, but only on certain days. This is the perfect information for an access control program.

DIFFERING CLASSES OR GROUPS OF CARD USERS, IF ANY

If different groups of card users are to be granted differing levels of access privileges, briefly explain the differences between card privileges. Janitors, for instance, may have ID cards with access control privilges that allows them to go into almost any room in an office building, while an entry-level worker like a file clerk may only have access to the room where he works, cafeteria, et al. Not only does clearly defining these levels of users help card holders understand their cards, it also can help to greatly enhance overall building security.

HOURS OR DAYS WHERE CARDS MUST BE USED TO ACCESS BUILDINGS, IF APPLICABLE

Will your facilities require the use of an access control card at all times? Will there be times when no access is granted to the building, even with an access control card? Explain these policies to card holders so they know with certainty when they may enter.

PROCEDURE FOR REPORTING A LOST OR STOLEN CARD

Access control cards may be lost from time to time, or in some cases, stolen. To make sure that card holders recover their cards quickly and that building safety is maintained, outline procedures for lost and stolen cards in your ID card program. When users know what exactly to do, it’s easier to make sure that cards are reissued quickly and that any lost or stolen cards are disabled properly.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ACCESS CONTROL CARDHOLDER

We all know the old saying “with rights come responsibility” and the same holds with access control cards. Explain to users what their responsibilities are, and what proper card use entails. Elaborate on misuse of cards, what is and is not permitted, and consequences for improper card use.

CARD RENEWAL AND EXPIRATION INFORMATION

Timing and expiration information can be especially pertinent for access control card programs, as many cards do expire. In your ID card program for access control cards, explain to users if and when their cards will expire, and how to have their card renewed or reissued.